Monday, February 20, 2017

See these Masonry Arch Bridges in nearly every state in the USA


You can fly to the south of France and visit the Pont du Gard aqueduct, a masterpiece of Roman engineering built of 21,000 cubic meters of limestone over a thousand years ago. But, if you can't travel that far, there are some spectacularly beautiful examples of masonry arches right here in the USA.

Alabama 

This gorgeous stone arch bridge built in 2002 is found in the 250-acre Blount Cultural Park in Montgomery, Alabama. It makes a perfect addition to the world-renowned Alabama Shakespeare Festival held here yearly.
This gorgeous stone arch bridge is located in Blount Cultural Park in Montgomery, Alabama.
Source: Yelp

Alaska 

In lieu of a stone arch bridge, which I couldn't find for Alaska, I suggest the Shrine of St. Therese in Juneau. Situated on 46 acres, the lovely stone shrine overlooking the Lynn Canal blends seamlessly with its wooded surroundings. Thousands of stones went into building the chapel and other structures on the property. I especially love the arched windows and doors.
The Shrine of St. Therese in Juneau, Alaska was finished in 1941.
Source: gillfoto on Wikimedia Commons

Arizona 

Formerly spanning the River Thames in London, England, the London Bridge in Lake Havasu City, Arizona was dismantled in 1967 in England and reassembled in Arizona in 1971. The bridge was purchased by Robert P. McCulloch, the founder of Lake Havasu City who had a reinforced concrete bridge built, then clad in the original London Bridge stonework.
The foundation stone for the London Bridge in Lake Havasu City, Arizona was relaid on September 23, 1968 by Sir Gilbert Inglefield, Lord Mayor of London.
Source: Ken Lund on Wikimedia Commons

Arkansas

The Shady Lake CCC Bridges were built by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) crews as part of the Shady Lake Dam project begun in October 1935. The bridges, built of native fieldstone with arches supported by corrugated steel culverts, were completed in December 1936 and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Shady Lake CCC Bridge No. 1 spans the South Fork of the Saline River on the eastern edge of Shady Lake in rural Polk County, Arkansas.

Shady Lake CCC Bridge No. 2 spans the East Fork of the Saline River on the northern edge of Shady Lake in rural Polk County, Arkansas.

The 40-foot long Shady Lake CCC Bridge No. 1 sits on the wooded slopes of the Ouachita Mountains over the South Fork of the Saline River in Polk County, Arkansas.
Source: Jerry Turner on Wikimedia Commons
Shady Lake CCC Bridge No. 2 is a double-span bridge about 60-feet in length and sits on the wooded slopes of the Ouachita Mountains over the East Fork of the Saline River in Polk County, Arkansas.
Source: Jerry Turner on Wikimedia Commons

California

You can find the Frank A. Miller Testimonial Peace Tower and Friendship Bridge on Mount Rubidoux in Riverside, California. In 1925, the city of Riverside decided to build a bridge to commemorate the work done by Frank Miller and his family. The dedication plaque reads:
Peace with Justice for all men. Anno Domini 1925. This bridge was built by neighbors and friends of Frank Augustus Miller in recognition of his constant labor in the promotion of civic beauty, community righteousness and world peace.
The names and coats of arms of all nations in 1925 are displayed on the stone tower. The stone bridge is a replica of the Alcántara bridge in Spain.
The World Peace Bridge on Mount Rubidoux in Riverside, California is a replica of the Alcántara Bridge in Spain.
Source: MissionInn.Jim on Wikimedia Commons

Colorado 

Located in Prowers County, Colorado and built in 1936 by the Works Progress Administration, the Douglas Crossing Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge has six 14-foot spans which total 112.8 ft in length over Two Butte Creek.

The six-span stone arch Douglas Crossing Bridge in Prowers County, Colorado was built in 1936.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Connecticut

The Farmington River Railroad Bridge over the Farmington River in Connecticut is a beautiful example of a stone arch bridge and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This picturesque sandstone arched bridge is 464 feet long and 30 feet wide and has carried trains from Harford to Springfield for about 150 years.
The historic stone arch Farmington River Railroad Bridge in Windsor, Connecticut was built in 1867.
Source: John Phelan on Wikimedia Commons

Delaware

There are several old stone culverts and bridges in New Castle County, Delaware. This one is the New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad Bridge in New Castle, New Castle County, Delaware which was posted on Facebook. The Library of Congress has more photos of stone culverts which cross Perch Creek in New Castle County.
An old stone bridge at New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad Right-of-Way in Delaware still supports vehicle traffic on a county road.
Source: Delmarva History on Facebook

Florida

Named after the endangered Torreya tree, Torreya State Park is located about 13 miles north of Bristol, Florida. The park and the structures within the park, including the Torreya Stone Arch Bridge, were built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The picturesque bridge sits at the base of a ravine and is visible from the main hiking trail in the park.
This gorgeous picture of the Torreya Stone Arch Bridge in Florida's Torreya State Park was taken by Marsha and Bernie on The Nomadic Life.

Georgia

Take a Civil War tour of the Chickamauga National Military Park in Georgia and visit a beautiful example of a stone bridge. The Lafayette Road Stone Arch Bridge spans a creek on Lafayette Road in Catoosa County, Georgia near the Chickamauga National Military Park's visitor's center.
The Lafayette Road Bridge is near the visitor's center in the Chickamauga National Military Park, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, Georgia.
Source: Library of Congress

Hawaii

Two stone arch bridges can be found on Hana Highway on between Haiku and Kaipahulu, Hana, Maui County, Hawaii. Both bridges were built in 1910 with 20-foot arch spans and 25-foot total lengths. The Hahalawe Stream Bridge arches over Hahalawe Stream on Hana Highway while the Waiele Stream Bridge arches over Waiele Stream on the same highway.

The Hana Belt Road is a remnant of Maui's around-the-island road system, is relatively unaltered, and a portion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The road has the "highest concentration of stylistically consistent historic bridges and culverts in the State of Hawaii," according to the Library of Congress.
The Hahalawe Stone Arch Bridge is located on Hana Belt Road near MM 43 between Haiku and Kaipahulu, Hana, Maui County, Hawaii.
Source: Jet Lowe on Wikimedia Commons
The Waiele Bridge is located on Hana Belt Road between Haiku and Kaipahulu, Hana, Maui County, Hawaii.
Source: Jet Lowe on Wikimedia Commons

Idaho

The Deep Creek Masonry Arch Bridge spanning Deep Creek on FR 468A in Idaho's Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness preserve was built by Lithuanian stone masons in the CCC in the 1930s. The stones were hand cut and placed to perfection. The arch was designed by Arthur Kahl, the USDA Forest Service regional bridge engineer between 1934 and 1962.
Deep Creek Bridge in the Frank Church Wilderness Area in Idaho was built entirely of hand-cut stones.
Source: Rick's Reel Adventures

Illinois

The Illinois Central Stone Arch Railroad Bridges are three bridges in Dixon, Illinois built of native Galena coursed limestone. The stones were placed without bond and were cut to fit with keys to prevent slippage. These elegant bridges have remained virtually unchanged since they were built in 1852-1855 and are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

Illinois Central Stone Arch Railroad Bridges, bridge over First Street, Dixon, Illinois. 
Source: IvoShandor on Wikimedia Commons
Illinois Central Stone Arch Railroad Bridges, bridge over Second Street, Dixon, Illinois. 
Source: IvoShandor on Wikimedia Commons
Illinois Central Stone Arch Railroad Bridges, bridge over Third Street (nicknamed "Little Sister" because of its lower clearance than the other two stone arch bridges in Dixon), Dixon, Illinois.
Source: IvoShandor on Wikimedia Commons

Indiana

Built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933, the Stone Arch Bridge over McCormick's Creek in McCormick's Creek State Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. According to the NRHP registration form, this bridge is the "best example of an arched bridge constructed by the CCC in any Indiana state park." It is built completely of rough-cut limestone, most of it salvaged from the grout pile at a quarry east of Ellettsville. The cornerstone on the bridge contains photographs and the names of everyone who worked on it.
The magnificent Stone Arch Bridge over McCormick's Creek in McCormick's Creek State Park east of Spencer in Washington Township, Owen County, Indiana has a round arch with a 54-foot span that is about 25 feet high.
Source: Nyttend on Wikimedia Commons

Iowa

Built in 1889, the Elkader Keystone Bridge in Elkader, Iowa is a 346-feet long, double-span stone arch bridge over the Turkey river and is the longest of its type west of the Mississippi. It was built of limestone from a local quarry and took nine months to construct. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Elkader Keystone Bridge in Elkader, Iowa is a prime example of 19th Century stone bridge construction.
Source: Joseph Elliott on Wikimedia Commons

Kansas

If you happen to be in Clements, Kansas, you can find the Clements Stone Arch Bridge, spanning the Cottonwood River just about a half mile south of the unincorporated community. Completed sometime in 1888, this beautiful double-arched bridge has been closed to traffic for some time, but can still be traversed by foot.
The Clements Stone Arch Bridge in Chase County, Kansas is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Source: Brylie on Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky

Built in about 1930 by the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the Glass Mill Bridge is a four-span stone arch bridge in Wilmore, Jessamine County, Kentucky. This limestone bridge looks very old and European even though it is younger than 100 years. Its 125 feet length spans the Jessamine Creek on Ky-1268.
The Glass Mill Bridge suffered some damage in 2010 after a crane was put on the top of the span to remove trees and debris accumulated after a flood. Engineers monitored it for months before declaring it safe.
Source: Your Rice Family Ezine

Louisiana

Three stone bridges in New Orleans City Park in Louisiana date back to the early 20th Century. The first bridge, the Langles Stone Bridge was built in 1902 in memory of Angela M. Langles for her gift of $650.00 to City Park. Ms. Langles and her mother died on July 4, 1898, after the French steamboat they were on, the La Bourgogne sank after colliding with another ship in the North Atlantic.

The second stone bridge, The Goldfish Bridge, was built in 1902 and spans Bayou Metairie. Thirdly, is the Pichot Stone Bridge, a rough-hewn cobblestone bridge dedicated to the memory of Henrietta M. Leonie Pichot for her gift of $192.00 in 1901 to City Park. 

The Langle Stone Arch Bridge sits over the mostly filled in Bayou Metairie in City Park, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Source: Infrogmation on Wikimedia Commons
The Goldfish Stone Bridge is the only way in New Orleans City Park to visit Goldfish Island and repair work was recently sponsored by the McLoughlin Family.
Source: New Orleans City Park
The Pichot Stone Bridge leads to a tiny peninsula overlooking Bayou Metairie.
Source: New Orleans City Park

Maine

During the early 20th Century, John D. Rockefeller Jr. designed and financed over 45 miles of carriage roads and 16 spectacular Carriage Road Bridges in Acadia National Park in the forests of Mount Desert Island in Maine. Every bridge is built with hand-hewn local granite. I couldn't choose just one bridge to post, so here are all sixteen!

Built in 1920, the Jordan Pond Bridge is a 20-foot single segment arch span and is 40 feet long.
Source: selectstone.com
The West Branch Bridge, built in 1931, stands 170 feet high with a 6-foot stone arch span and curves over the Jordan Stream ravine
Source: selectstone.com

Spanning Jordan Stream and built in 1917, the Cobblestone Bridge was the first to be built and is unique with its rounded boulder facing.
Source: Acadian Soul

Built in 1933, the Stanley Brook Bridge connects Seal Harbor Beach and Jordon Pond with its triple arches. Stanley Brook road runs under the main arch and the two smaller arches cross Stanley Brook and the Seaside Path.
Source: David Brossard on flickr
The Jordan Pond Road Bridge was built in 1932 and carries automobiles over the carriage road from Seal Harbor to Jordan Pond.
Source: BA Bartlett on Panoramio

The Deer Brook Bridge was built in 1925 and stands tall above Deer Brook near Jordan Cliffs with its narrow 8-foot span double arches.
Source: David Fulmer on flickr
A smaller 20-foot arch span over Chasm Brook is the Chasm Brook Bridge, built in 1927.
Source: Acadian Soul

Crossing Maple Spring Brook is the impressive Gothic-arched Hemlock Bridge, built in 1925.
Source: Gains and Losses: Life Through Sharon's Eyes

The 125-foot long Waterfall Bridge arches over Hadlock Brook and was completed in 1925.
Source: Kevin A. Trostle on Wikimedia Commons

Built in 1926, the 40-foot Hadlock Bridge also spans Hadlock Brook with its 20-foot span segmental arch. 
Source: BA Bartlett on Panoramio

Built in 1927, Eagle Lake Bridge is 118 feet long and boasts a massive Gothic arch. State Route 233 crosses the bridge over the carriage road.
Source: Gains and Losses: Life Through Sharon's Eyes

The stunning triple-arched Duck Brook Bridge, completed in 1929, has a central 30-foot span with 20-foot spans on either side.
Source: Acadian Soul

An elliptical-arched bridge, the Bubble Pond Bridge has a 30-foot arch span and was built in 1928.
Source: Gains and Losses: Life Through Sharon's Eyes

One of the earlier built bridges, completed in 1919, the Little Harbor Brook Bridge has a 20-foot arch span over Little Harbor Brook.
Source: Gains and Losses: Life Through Sharon's Eyes

The magnificent Amphitheatre Bridge was built in 1928 and is 236 feet long with a 50-foot rounded arch span.
Source: Gains and Losses: Life Through Sharon's Eyes

Built in 1932, the Cliffside Bridge resembles a medieval English castle and is 232-feet long with a 50-foot span segmental arch spanning a ravine.
Source: Selectstone.com

Maryland

The Union Arch Bridge in Cabin John, Maryland was built under the supervision of Captain Montgomery C. Meigs of the Army Corps of Engineers. The 220-foot masonry single-span arch was the longest span the world had ever seen at the time and its Massachusetts granite and Seneca sandstone trim inspired a plethora of postcards. It is well worth a visit and if you'd like to read more about its history or see some of the historical postcards, check out the Streets of Washington blog.

The Union Arch Bridge in Cabin John, Maryland was completed in 1864 during the Civil War and was designed as part of the Washington Aqueduct.
Source: Moreau1 on Wikimedia Commons

Massachusetts 

Ipswich, Massachusetts boasts the oldest documented surviving double stone arch bridge in North America--the Choate Bridge. The bridge was opened in 1764 and is a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. Two elliptical arches of random-coursed granite ashlar blocks span 30 feet each. This is definitely on my "Must-See" list!
The Choate Bridge in Ipswich, Massachusetts is the oldest double stone arch bridge in North America.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Michigan

Constructed in 1891 and still standing today, the Ramsay Keystone Bridge is situated south from US-2 in Gogebic County in Ramsay, Michigan. The Chicago and Northwestern Railroad built this impressive 57-foot high limestone bridge with a center keystone at the top which locks the bridge into place. It is, indeed, a rare find as well as one of the largest stone bridges in Michigan.
The Keystone Bridge in Ramsay dates back to 1891 and is one of Michigan's largest stone arch bridges.
Source: Yooper 2 on Ugly Hedgehog

Minnesota 

The Stone Arch Bridge over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, Minnesota is one-of-a-kind. It measures 2100-feet long by 28-feet wide with 23 arches made of native granite and limestone. It is a beautiful example of a masonry bridge which is also a National Historic Engineering Landmark.

The Stone Arch Bridge over the Mississippi River below St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis, Minnesota, has beautiful curves.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Mississippi

The Halls Ferry Arch Bridge spanning Halls Ferry Road at Confederate Avenue in Vicksburg, Mississippi is the only extant bridge of its type in Mississippi. Built between 1936 and 1937 by Coggin and Deermont of Chipley, Florida, the bridge is a reinforced concrete closed-spandrel arch bridge faced with red brick. Its total length is about 50 feet, with a deck width of about 26 feet. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Halls Ferry Bridge spanning Halls Ferry Road at Confederate Avenue in Vicksburg, Warren County, Mississippi is a beautiful brick arch bridge.
Source: Library of Congress

Missouri

Between Kansas City and Independence, the Blue Ridge Bridge in Jackson County, Missouri arches gracefully over MO 12 on Blue Ridge Boulevard. The arch, built of rubble stone in 1906 by the Forrester-Swenson Construction Co., spans about 69 feet and the bridge length totals about 86 feet.
The rubble stone Blue Ridge Bridge in Kansas City, Missouri was rededicated in 2014 after Jackson County made improvements and reinforcements, declaring the bridge, "Good to go for another 50 years."
Source: Google Maps

Montana

The Triple Arches, a three-span masonry arch half-bridge about two miles west of Logan Pass on the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, was built between 1926 and 1928. The Triple Arches are truly an engineering marvel--a solution to the problem of building a solid retaining wall that would be over twenty feet in depth. The arched half-bridge rests on the solid rock cliffs and ledges of Pollock Mountain, which eliminated the need for massive excavation. The Going-to-the-Sun Road is one of the few roads in the country designated as a national landmark and is definitely a Must-See!
Going-To-The-Sun Road Triple Arch Bridge in Flathead County, Montana
Source: GlacierNPS on Wikimedia Commons

Nebraska

Built in 1916 by the Keim Cement Company three miles east and one mile north of Tecumseh, Nebraska, the Keim Stone Arch Bridge remains almost completely unchanged and continues to carry traffic today. The limestone bridge's total length is 29 feet and its arch spans 28 feet and it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Keim Stone Arch Bridge is located on 624 Ave. just south of 729 Rd. in Johnson County, Nebraska.
Source: Ammodramus on Wikimedia Commons

Nevada

There may be a stone bridge or two in Nevada, but my search yielded not a one. However, the wonderful Ward Charcoal Ovens in the Ward Charcoal Ovens State Historic Park in the Egan Mountain Range in eastern Nevada are a prime example of fine masonry work with their arched doors and beehive-shaped double curves. They were built shortly after silver was discovered in the area in 1872 by the Martin and White Company of San Francisco. Made of tertiary volcanic and quartz latite tuff chipped out of nearby mountains by hand, the ovens are 30 feet high and 27 feet in diameter with a wall thickness of 20 inches.
Visit the Ward Charcoal Ovens in Ely, Nevada's Ward Charcoal Ovens State Historic Park.
Source: Famartin on Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire

Hillsborough, New Hampshire boasts a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in the form of five stone arch masonry bridges. According to ASCE.org:
These five bridges, Carr Bridge (mid 1800's), Gleason Falls Bridges (circa 1830), Gleason Falls Road over Beard's Brook (mid 1800's), Second New Hampshire Turnpike Bridge (circa 1864), and Sawyer Bridge (circa 1866), constitute the largest extant cluster of dry-laid stone arch bridges within the United States. They were built by trained masonry craftsmen and continue to demonstrate the durability of such construction.
The granite stones were carefully cut and fitted so the bridges could be built without mortar. These dry-laid stone arch bridges show five different methods of construction listed on the ASCE website. They are: "Spandrel walls of cut stone; Spandrel walls of field stone; Granite posts for rails (including keystones doubling as posts); Single arch and double arch structures; Various span to rise proportions."

At any rate, these bridges are definitely on my bucket list of bridges to see!
Carr Bridge
Source:  Henniker House Bed and Breakfast
Gleason Falls Road over Beard's Brook
Source: Henniker House Bed and Breakfast
Gleason Falls Bridge over Beard's Brook
Source: Henniker House Bed and Breakfast
Sawyer Bridge
Source: Life, On A Bridged
Second New Hampshire Turnpike Bridge
Source: NellieH1

New Jersey

This lovely stone arch bridge, the Brugler Road Bridge, was built in 1860 in Warren County, New Jersey. Its total length is 145 feet and the length of the largest span is 21 ft. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is still open to traffic today.
The Brugler Road Bridge crosses the bucolic Paulins Kill in Knowlton, New Jersey.
Source: WallyFromColumbia on Wikimedia Commons

New Mexico

Some gorgeous masonry arches can be found in Las Vegas, New Mexico. Built in 1898, the Castaneda Hotel sits along Amtrak's Southwest Chief line.  One of New Mexico's Harvey Houses, the Mission Revival style hotel was originally about 50,000 square feet and boasted many graceful masonry arches. The hotel closed in 1948 and has been rumored to be haunted.
The ruins of the Casenada Hotel in Las Vegas, New Mexico
Source: Aidan Wakely-Mulroney on flickr

New York

I immediately thought of the gorgeous stone bridges in Central Park, when I was planning this blog post, but after a little research I realized many people have documented these bridges and there are some really great sites you can visit to guide you through the park. I really love Bridgehunter.com. They have a great collection of photos and information about the Central Park bridges. 

The bridge I decided to feature is also fairly well-known/notorious. The triple-arch Stone Arch Bridge at Kenoza Lake near Jeffersonville, Sullivan County, New York was built in 1873 of hand cut stone and spans East Branch Callicoon Creek. 

According to the Sullivan County Historical Society, the Stone Arch Bridge was built by Philip Henry Hembdt, a Swiss-German settler who brought his skill in stone masonry with him from the old country. People claim this bridge is haunted by the ghost of a man who was murdered on the bridge. The historical society tells the story: "In 1882 one of the few Hex murders on record in the Upper Delaware Valley was committed on the Stone Arch Bridge. The victim, accused of bewitching cattle, was shot, clubbed and thrown into the flood swollen creek waters."

So, perhaps a Halloween visit to this bridge might be in order.

This graceful triple-arch Stone Arch Bridge at Kenoza Lake in New York State is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is well-known for its beauty and ghost stories.
Source: Vonsky87 on Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina

The Hunting Creek Stone Railroad Bridge in Morganton, North Carolina was built around 1860 and is a rare example of antebellum, stone bridge construction in the state. The bridge is no longer in use but remains virtually unchanged except for the removal of the railroad track. The two-span arched bridge is likely the work of William Murdoch who built it of coursed, rough-faced ashlar.
The Hunting Creek Stone Railroad Bridge is located across Hunting Creek just north of Highway 64-70 and is almost directly underneath the present 1910 metal railroad bridge.
Source: Tonyleeglenn on Wikimedia Commons

North Dakota

Not a bridge, but it has a fantastic stone arch and is a modern day stone marvel--the Paul Broste Rock Museum was built with natural granite quarried from the beautiful Great Plains of North Dakota. Paul Broste was a local farmer, artist and rock collector. He dreamed of housing his polished rock collection in a unique museum and he made his dreams come true with the help of many volunteers who built this "Acropolis on a hill" which opened for business in 1966.
The world famous Paul Broste Rock Museum is in Parshall, North Dakota.
Source: Rzacher on Wikimedia Commons

Ohio

Come to see the Devil's Bathtub and stay for the heavenly stone bridge. Located in Ohio's Hocking Hills State Park, the Devil's Bathtub Bridge lies between the Upper Falls and the A-Frame Bridge along the Old Man's Cave area hiking trails.

Captivating whirlpools form during heavy rainfall in the Devil's Bathtub, a bowl-shaped basin under the stone bridge.
Source: Yprahs on Wikimedia Commons

Below the Devil's Bathtub in Ohio's Hocking Hills State Park is nice view of the stone arch bridge.
Source: Waymarking

Oklahoma

Built in 1909 and dedicated the same year on February 12, the centennial of Abraham Lincoln's birth, this stone arch bridge was christened, "The Lincoln Bridge." The bridge connects the Flower Park area and the city of Sulphur, Oklahoma to the mineral springs south of Travertine Creek.
The stone-arch Lincoln Bridge is the first and oldest developed structure built in the Platt Historic District in Sulphur Oklahoma.
Source: Granger Meador on flickr

Oregon

Stone arch bridges are rare in Oregon. This stone arch overlook is part of the Johnson Creek Fish Ladder and Overlook in Portland, Oregan. The facility was built by the Works Progress Administration to address Johnson Creek's annual flooding problems and to provide spawning opportunities for migrating fish. The channel is lined with hand-cut basalt stone on both sides of the creek with steep rock walls averaging 6 to 8 feet high. The arched overlook was built with locally quarried basalt stone.
The Johnson Creek Fish Ladder and Stone Arch Overlook were built of local basalt stone during the 1930s by the New Deal's WPA.
Source: Judith Kenny on The Living New Deal

Pennsylvania 

The Rockville Arch Bridge which crosses the Susquehanna River just north of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was completed in 1902 and is the world's longest stone masonry arch railroad bridge. Its 3,820-foot length has 48 spans, each 70 feet long.
Located north of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the Rockville Arch Bridge is the world's longest stone arch bridge.
Source:  Wikimedia Commons

Rhode Island

In Pawtucket, Rhode Island, spanning the Seekonk River along Divison Street stands the picture-perfect Division Street Bridge. Built in 1877, the bridge is about 450 feet long with nine spans made of stone and brick. The Division Street Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Division Street Bridge is said to be the "finest and longest" stone-arch bridge in Rhode Island. It is now in need of repairs but is considered to be architecturally and historically significant.
Source: Marc N. Belanger on Wikimedia Commons

South Carolina 

This picturesque Gothic stone arch bridge over Little Gap Creek in South Carolina was built with wedge shaped rocks and erected without concrete. The 14-foot Gothic arch makes it a rare example of a masonry bridge in the USA. The Poinsett Bridge was originally part of the State Road from Charleston through Columbia, South Carolina to North Carolina and was named for Joel Roberts Poinsett. The bridge is now part of the 120-acre Poinsett Bridge Heritage Preserve and is near a nature trail. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Poinsett Bridge, built in 1820, is believed to be the oldest surviving bridge in South Carolina.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

South Dakota

The Park Road Bridge, a stone arch pedestrian bridge near Devil's Gulch in Garretson, South Dakota was built in 1935 by the Works Progress Administration. Its total length is 55.1 ft and it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Park Road Pedestrian Bridge spans Split Rock Creek near Devil's Gulch in Garretson, Minnehaha County, South Dakota.
Source: AlexiusHoratius on Wikimedia Commons

Tennessee

The seven-span stone Cumberland Mountain State Park Arch Bridge over the dam on Byrd Creek is also known as the Byrd Creek Bridge. Built in 1936, its longest span is 19 feet with a total length of 317.8 feet. It was posted to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. If you decide to visit this beautiful bridge, it is also interesting to note that the Byrd Creek Dam is the largest masonry structure the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) ever built.
The Cumberland Mountain State Park Stone Arch Bridge is located in Cumberland Mountain State Park near Crossville, Tennessee.
Source: Brent Moore on flickr

Texas 

Built in 1942 as a WPA project, the Possum Kingdom Masonry Arch Bridge spanning the Brazos River on State Route 16 has eighteen spans of cut limestone. The bridge is 43 feet long and is the longest masonry arch bridge in Texas. It sits one mile downstream from the Morris Sheppard Dam, roughly eleven miles west of Graford, Texas. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Possum Kingdom Bridge is the longest masonry arch bridge in Texas.
Source: Nicolas Henderson on flickr

Utah

The Pine Creek Bridge complements its natural surroundings with its native sandstone and ashlar masonry. It was constructed by the National Park Service and Bureau of Public Roads in 1927-1930 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Located on the Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, this bridge is unaltered and still maintains its structural integrity.
The Pine Creek Stone Arch Bridge in Zion National Park, Utah blends beautifully with the sandstone surroundings.
Source: Deanna's Weaving

Vermont

The Simpsonville Stone Arch Bridge over Simpson Brook was built in about 1909 by James Otis Follet, a local farmer, mason, and intuitive engineer and is one of the few surviving Follett bridges in the region. The single span rises 6 feet above the brook and the arch extends 20 feet at its base. The stone arch is built of large rectangular blocks of granite, roughly pitched and mortared into regular courses.
The Simpsonville Stone Arch Bridge carries Vermont Route 35 across Simpson Brook, north of Townshend, Vermont.
Source: Magicpiano on Wikimedia Commons

Virginia

Built in 1874 by the Valley Railroad, the historic Valley Railroad Stone Bridge has fourteen arched spans totaling 130 feet in length. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is built of granite and faced in ashlar.
A beautiful redbud tree blooms in front of the Valley Railroad Stone Bridge across Folly Mills Creek in Virginia.
Source: Virginia Department of Transportation on flickr

Washington

Four sets of waterfalls and a spectacular old stone bridge bring visitors to Whatcom Falls Park in Bellingham, Washington. Built in 1939 by the WPA, the Whatcom Creek Stone Arch Pedestrian Bridge was constructed from Chuckanut sandstone. The bridge is only 100 yards from a parking area for those who don't have time to walk the mile loop in the park.
This mossy WPA-built stone arch bridge overlooks Whatcom Falls in Bellingham, Washington.
Source: mtsvancouver on Wikimedia Commons

Washington, D.C.

The Wisconsin Avenue Stone Bridge arches over the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal on Wisconsin Avenue in the Georgetown area of Washington, D.C. Currently carrying a public road open to traffic, the bridge's arch has a length of 54.1 feet and the bridge itself has a total length of 62 feet. Built in 1900, the bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Wisconsin Avenue bridge in Georgetown is built of local gneiss. The original wrought-iron railing dates back to 1831.
Source: DC Public Library Commons on Wikimedia Commons

West Virginia

Built in 1817, the 3-span Elm Grove Stone Arch Bridge is the oldest extant bridge in West Virginia. The 208-foot long bridge Carries U.S. Route 40 over Little Wheeling Creek in Elm Grove. Elliptical arches give the bridge a "humpback" look with the middle arch spanning 38 feet and the end arches spanning 25 feet each.

The Elm Grove Stone Arch Bridge over Wheeling Creek in Elm Grove, West Virginia was sprayed with gunite in 1958, which covered the original limestone blocks.
Source: Bwsmith84 on Wikimedia Commons

Wisconsin

The Tiffany Stone Arch Bridge Over Turtle Creek in Rock County, Wisconsin was built in 1869 by the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad, but the five arches were reinforced in the 1930s with concrete rings to support modern diesel locomotives. The substructure stone is from Wapun and the superstructure stone is from Duck Creek near Green Bay. The total length of the bridge is 387 ft and it is the oldest stone arch bridge in use today in Wisconsin.
The five-span Tiffany Stone Arch Bridge spanning Turtle Creek, Tiffany, Rock County, Wisconsin is the oldest stone arch bridge in use in Wisconsin today
Source: Mark's Postcards from Beloit on flickr

Wyoming

In Wyoming, I found the most interesting stone arch, not in bridge form, but in castle form. The Castle, a sandstone picnic shelter, looks like a medieval stronghold atop a hill in Guernsey State Park. Constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the mid-1930s, the stone workmanship is absolutely amazing. The arch is located in the west end of the structure and frames a scenic view of Laramie Peak.
The Castle is a two room picnic shelter at Guernsey State Park in Wyoming and is one of the finest stone arch structures built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s.
Source: OnlyInYourState

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